Archive | July, 2011

Freestyle Friday: Things That I’m Into

29 Jul
By Darryl Ayo

Welcome back to Freestyle Friday. I’m going to talk about a handful of comics. Are you ready? Let’s go:

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Chk chk chk

27 Jul
by Kevin Czap

Dave Sim

Maybe you’ve heard of that band called !!!. Like the title to Pootie’s new hit single, it’s a name that is sure to give radio disc jockeys the world over pause. Most of us (especially us, being comics afficianados and enthusiasts) are familiar with the concept that their name implies, but !!! is really not something that can transition into spoken language very smoothly. The accepted pronunciation is “chk chk chk” although I guess the official word is it’s open to interpretation.

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Save Comics.

25 Jul
By Darryl Ayo

Comics can never die, so they can’t be in need of saving. This article is specifically about the North American comic book paradigm, particularly as created for, and distributed by, the Direct Market. Before you read further, I have no qualifications. I am just a person with a laptop.

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Classroom in the sky

21 Jul
By Darryl Ayo

“Thunderjet,” 1952. Written by Harvey Kurtzman and drawn by Alex Toth for FRONTLINE COMBAT #8.

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Oh Lawd

20 Jul

By Darryl Ayo

“Abe Lincoln,” 1952. Written by Harvey Kurtzman, drawn by Jack Davis for FRONTLINE COMBAT #9.

When I say that EC Comics tended to write in a fashion that was highly cliche by this point, I wasn’t kidding. For instance, Spoiler:

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Lovefest – John Paul Leon

20 Jul
by Kevin Czap

John Paul Leon, Earth X #10

Recently I got around to reading an issue of Static Shock I have lying around, and just watched 2001: A Space Odyssey at the Cinematheque. These two things combined led me to think about how much I love the comics of John Paul Leon. Naturally.

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The small things that change

19 Jul
By Darryl Ayo

“Ace,” 1952 written by Harvey Kurtzman, drawn by John Severin for FRONTLINE COMBAT #6

Every now and every then, I remember that the perfect North American comic books are the 1950s EC Comics. MAD was the best, but EC’s line included a lot of wonderful specimens of comic bookery.

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